Attributing mental attitudes to normative systems (bibtex)
by Guido Boella, Leendert W. N. van der Torre
Abstract:
In agent theory mental attitudes such as beliefs, desires, goals and intentions are attributed to autonomous computer systems to facilitate the specification, design and implementation of such systems. Using the methodology of this intentional stance we can say that, for example, the system believes the records in its database, or that the system responds to the user's request -- or it neglects it! -- because it desires to do so. Boella and Lesmo suggest that analogously we can attribute mental attitudes to normative systems like security, legal or moral systems, such that obligations of an agent can be interpreted as the desires or goals of the normative system. The motivation of their interpretation is the study of reasons why agents fulfill or violate sanction-based obligations. In this paper we are interested in the attribution of mental attitudes to normative multiagent systems to facilitate their specification, design and implementation. One of the roles of obligations in multiagent systems is to stabilize the behavior of a multiagent system, and obligations thus play the same role for multiagent systems as intentions do for single agent systems. We address the following two questions: How can the attribution of mental attitudes to normative multiagent systems be explained? How can the attribution of mental attitudes to normative systems be used in agent theory?
Reference:
Attributing mental attitudes to normative systems (Guido Boella, Leendert W. N. van der Torre), In AAMAS, 2003.
Bibtex Entry:
@InProceedings{Boella2003i,
  Title                    = {Attributing mental attitudes to normative systems},
  Author                   = {Guido Boella and Leendert W. N. van der Torre},
  Booktitle                = {AAMAS},
  Year                     = {2003},
  Pages                    = {942-943},

  Abstract                 = {In agent theory mental attitudes such as beliefs, desires, goals and intentions are attributed to autonomous computer systems to facilitate the specification, design and implementation of such systems. Using the methodology of this intentional stance we can say that, for example, the system believes the records in its database, or that the system responds to the user's request -- or it neglects it! -- because it desires to do so. Boella and Lesmo suggest that analogously we can attribute mental attitudes to normative systems like security, legal or moral systems, such that obligations of an agent can be interpreted as the desires or goals of the normative system. The motivation of their interpretation is the study of reasons why agents fulfill or violate sanction-based obligations.
In this paper we are interested in the attribution of mental attitudes to normative multiagent systems to facilitate their specification, design and implementation. One of the roles of obligations in multiagent systems is to stabilize the behavior of a multiagent system, and obligations thus play the same role for multiagent systems as intentions do for single agent systems. We address the following two questions: How can the attribution of mental attitudes to normative multiagent systems be explained? How can the attribution of mental attitudes to normative systems be used in agent theory?},
  Bibsource                = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  Crossref                 = {DBLP:conf/atal/2003},
  Ee                       = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/860575.860736},
  File                     = {http://icr.uni.lu/leonvandertorre/papers/aamas03.pdf},
  Timestamp                = {2013.07.26},
  Url                      = {http://dl.acm.org/authorize?767096}
}
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