Permission and Authorization in Normative Multiagent Systems (bibtex)
by Guido Boella, Leendert W. N. van der Torre
Abstract:
The distinction between the notions of permission and authorization is subtle. In the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary [4] permitting is "to allow something", "to make it possible for someone to do something, or to not prevent something from happening", while authorizing means "to give someone official permission to do something". Law studies argue that the distinction goes beyond the "officiality" of authorization. E.g., the Del Giudice [5]'s dictionary of law argues that adding or removing an authorization does not change the normative status of an agent while adding or removing a permission does. Authorizations change what is obligatory or permitted for agents without adding or removing norms. However, though legal philosophers distinguish permission from authorization, the distinction between the two is ignored in many (agent) theories and systems. How can this apparent paradox be explained?
Reference:
Permission and Authorization in Normative Multiagent Systems (Guido Boella, Leendert W. N. van der Torre), In ICAIL, 2005.
Bibtex Entry:
@InProceedings{Boella2005l,
  Title                    = {Permission and Authorization in Normative Multiagent Systems},
  Author                   = {Guido Boella and Leendert W. N. van der Torre},
  Booktitle                = {ICAIL},
  Year                     = {2005},
  Pages                    = {236-237},

  Abstract                 = {The distinction between the notions of permission and authorization is subtle. In the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary [4] permitting is "to allow something", "to make it possible for someone to do something, or to not prevent something from happening", while authorizing means "to give someone official permission to do something". Law studies argue that the distinction goes beyond the "officiality" of authorization. E.g., the Del Giudice [5]'s dictionary of law argues that adding or removing an authorization does not change the normative status of an agent while adding or removing a permission does. Authorizations change what is obligatory or permitted for agents without adding or removing norms. However, though legal philosophers distinguish permission from authorization, the distinction between the two is ignored in many (agent) theories and systems. How can this apparent paradox be explained? },
  Bibsource                = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  Crossref                 = {DBLP:conf/icail/2005},
  File                     = {http://icr.uni.lu/leonvandertorre/papers/icail05.pdf},
  Timestamp                = {2013.07.26},
  Url                      = {http://dl.acm.org/authorize?837692}
}
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