A Foundational Ontology of Organizations and Roles (bibtex)
by G. Boella, L. van der Torre
Abstract:
In this paper we propose a foundational ontology of the social concepts of organization and role which structure institutions. We identify which axioms model social concepts like organization and role and which properties distinguish them from other categories like objects and agents: the organizational structure of institutions, the relation between roles and organizations, and the powers among the components of an organization. All social concepts depend on descriptions defining them, which are collectively accepted, and the description defining the components of organizations, including roles, are included in the description of the organizations they belong to. Thus, the relational dependence of roles means that they are defined in the organizations they belong to. Finally, powers inside organizations are defined by the fact that components of an organization can access the state of the organization whose definition they depend on and of the other components, thus violating the standard encapsulation principle of objects.
Reference:
A Foundational Ontology of Organizations and Roles (G. Boella, L. van der Torre), In Declarative Agent Languages and Technologies IV, 4th International Workshop (DALT'06), volume 4327, 2006.
Bibtex Entry:
@InProceedings{Boella2006f,
  Title                    = {A Foundational Ontology of Organizations and Roles},
  Author                   = {G. Boella and L. van der Torre},
  Booktitle                = {Declarative Agent Languages and Technologies IV, 4th International Workshop (DALT'06)},
  Year                     = {2006},
  Pages                    = {78-88},
  Series                   = {LNCS},
  Volume                   = {4327},

  Abstract                 = {In this paper we propose a foundational ontology of the social concepts of organization and role which structure institutions. We identify which axioms model social concepts like organization and role and which properties distinguish them from other categories like objects and agents: the organizational structure of institutions, the relation between roles and organizations, and the powers among the components of an organization. All social concepts depend on descriptions defining them, which are collectively accepted, and the description defining the components of organizations, including roles, are included in the description of the organizations they belong to. Thus, the relational dependence of roles means that they are defined in the organizations they belong to. Finally, powers inside organizations are defined by the fact that components of an organization can access the state of the organization whose definition they depend on and of the other components, thus violating the standard encapsulation principle of objects.},
  Affiliation              = {icr},
  Bdsk-url-1               = {http://icr.uni.lu/leonvandertorre/papers/dalt06.pdf},
  Timestamp                = {2013.07.26},
  Url                      = {http://icr.uni.lu/leonvandertorre/papers/dalt06.pdf}
}
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